eISSN: 2353-9461
ISSN: 0860-7796
BioTechnologia
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3/2021
vol. 102
 
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abstract:
RESEARCH PAPERS

Protein patterns and their association with photosynthetic pigment content, agronomic behavior, and origin of purslane accessions (Portulaca oleracea L.)

Daryush Talei
1
,
Amir Mohammad Naji
2

1.
Medicinal Plants Research Center, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran
2.
Department of Biotechnology, Agriculture Faculty, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran
BioTechnologia vol. 102 (3) C pp. 245–255 C 2021
Online publish date: 2021/09/30
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In this study, the proteomic, morphometric, and photosynthetic pigment data of purslane (Portulaca oleracea) accessions were combined together to show their impact on genetic variation in order to establish a relationship between protein patterns and phenotypic behavior of the plant. Seeds of 18 collected purslane accessions were cultivated based on a completely randomized design with three replicates. Before the flowering stage, the data on morphology, photosynthetic pigment content, and seed proteins were obtained. The results showed a significant difference among purslane accessions in terms of the most studied agronomic characteristics and the content of photosynthetic pigments and proteins. The cluster analysis of the 18 purslane accessions based on agronomic data, and photosynthetic pigment content, and protein pattern data produced three main clusters. Moreover, the seed protein analysis revealed that the two polymorphic protein bands of size 40 kDa (protein “a”) and 30 kDa (protein “b”) effectively diversified the agronomic, photosynthetic pigment, and phylogenetic relationships among the purslane accessions. Interestingly, protein “a” was produced in plants growing in low altitude areas and played a suppressive role for TDW, while protein “b” was produced in plants growing in high altitude areas and functioned as an activator agent for this trait. Overall, the outcomes of the present study indicated the presence of high genetic variability (77.6%) among the purslane accessions. These findings suggest that these proteins should be sequenced for further proteomic analyses and can be used for hybridization to generate useful recombinants in segregating generations and improve breeding varieties of P. oleracea.
keywords:

chlorophyll, genetic diversity, morphometric, Portulaca oleracea, protein pattern

 
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